Still Learning To See

Finding art

I was lost much of these past few days, wondering where my photography is going and feeling stymied by ego. I needed to stop pushing and to simply be open. In that space I’m beginning to see some of what has been right in front of me.

Tonight I sat in the second row in a remarkable, small music hall, the Chandler, in Randolph, VT, to listen to Mehahem Pressler. This little, old man who plays so deliberately, so effortlessly and with such passion that many of us were weeping openly. The Schubert Sonata in B-Flat Major brought us to our feet. And then, just so we didn’t get too serious, his second encore was Lullaby, a clear sign he’d enjoyed himself but the evening had come to an end.

I’m inspired and feel back on course again. While I’d love to show a photograph of the man’s hands at work, that is not possible tonight. Instead I have a favorite photograph I made at a friend’s wedding several years ago of the hands of the accordion player! Maybe one day I will photograph Pressler at the keyboard, until then this link on YouTube will have to do!

“I once was lost but now I am found,” as the old song goes. Here is what Pressler says:

“I have devoted my life to the piano and to music-making. Whether you acquire public fame or not, devoting one’s existence to serving art provides a rich life and the healthiest form of fulfillment. I feel music is my religion, the hall is my temple and the composer is my God whose works I preach. It is no exaggeration to say that music saved my life.”

Amen!

 

This entry was published on March 31, 2012 at 10:56 pm. It’s filed under People, Photograph and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

3 thoughts on “Finding art

  1. Barbara Smith on said:

    Your words inspire me every day. I keep them in mind while I am exploring Ireland.

  2. Julia on said:

    What a marvel–I felt the same way when I took my father’s old Navy binoculars to Orchestra Hall in Detroit so I could really SEE Christopher Parkening’s hands play the classical guitar. Being in the presence of any form of excellence is both humbling and inspiring.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: