Still Learning To See

Waking up with the crowing roosters

Vinales, a hard two-hour drive west of Havana, is a rich agricultural area and home to many tobacco farms. The limestone mogotes dominate the valley with their stunning presence.

Vinales, a hard two-hour drive west of Havana, is a rich agricultural area and home to many tobacco farms,. The limestone mogotes dominate the valley with their stunning presence.

All but one of the ten mornings we awoke in Cuba—including our time in Havana—roosters were our alarm clocks. Occasionally they started at 3:00am, clearly not having gotten the message to wait until dawn.

Cuba-7627By 6:00 much of the world—urban or rural—was awake and underway with their days: kids off to school, oxen harnessed, bread deliveries, talking at the bus stop or waiting for a ride under an overpass, and long racks of tobacco already picked and hung to dry.

Especially in the farm communities, which of course is most of Cuba, the day began early and in earnest, no doubt a habit formed because later in the spring and summer the afternoons can be brutally warm. These people are intimately connected to the land, roosters and all, and it is hard to imagine it being any other way.

Cuba-7708

This entry was published on March 16, 2016 at 8:34 pm. It’s filed under John Snell, John Snell Photographer, Photograph and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

3 thoughts on “Waking up with the crowing roosters

  1. Such beautiful reports from Cuba! Thank you very much for sharing the photos and stories.

  2. Enjoying your Cuban series very much!

  3. Deborah Leu on said:

    Wonderful rural shots! I have to laugh about the rooster alarm clocks. I had forgotten, but it was the same in the Marshalls – those roosters wake up well before the sun does.

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