Still Learning To See

Ice evolving

I don’t get tired of seeing ice. If you do, this post may not be for you! We have lots of the stuff and I love to watch how it evolves as conditions change.

I made these photographs last week in Middlesex. The temperatures had been in the teens for a couple days, promoting more freezing, and we’d not yet gotten our big dump of snow. I encourage you to click on each photo to see it in a larger format.

And, if you have ice nearby today, even on a puddle or a birdbath, take a few minutes to see what it really looks like; for those of you in warm climes, you could actually put a bowl of water in the freezer if you wanted to! Regardless, enjoy either these photos or the real world or both.

At a quiet bend in the stream two kinds of ice meet.

At a quiet bend in the stream two kinds of ice meet. The shore ice on the bottom had formed several days prior and the main flow ice on the top formed as it finally got colder.

This ice had changed so much over a two week period. It was now disconnected from the water and much of it had evaporated—sublimated—leaving needle-like shards in intricate patterns.

This ice had changed so much over a two-week period. It was now disconnected from the water and much of it had evaporated—sublimated—leaving needle-like shards in intricate patterns.[gallery type="rectangular" ids="3392,3369"]

 

This entry was published on December 19, 2013 at 9:59 am. It’s filed under Abstract, Ice, John Snell, Patterns, Snow, Vermont, Water, Winter and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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