Still Learning To See

Pastoral Vermont

I walk or hike most weeks with my two dear friends, Rob and Michael, wherever the spirit takes us. Lately, due to my sore ankle, we’ve walked back roads. Recently we encountered a fine little book, I Left my Sole in Vermont, by Nicole Grubman, that has helped us discover a number of other fabulous, local road walks.

While romanticizing old rural Vermont is often tempting, I also always find it ill-advised. However, it offers a clear glimpse back into a period of time that is at once both not far away and still very much 19th century. I often feel there are lessons we can learn that may guide us into the future—lessons of providing for our needs more locally and living more simply.

And, as I said yesterday, I find the landscapes stunningly beautiful. As Michael said, “Walking is the perfect speed to see Vermont!”

This entry was published on October 21, 2013 at 8:29 am. It’s filed under Fall colors, John Snell, People, Photograph, Vermont and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

2 thoughts on “Pastoral Vermont

  1. These images bring such a sense of nostalgia for me, John–Ohio had these same sights when I was growing up, and I well remember jumping into haystacks from an upper door in the barn. All those sights and sounds and smells didn’t cost a thing. You’re so right–we shouldn’t romanticize the past, but certainly can learn from it if we SLOW DOWN. Michael made a good point, which I’ll generalize: “Walking is the perfect speed.” Thanks for the reminder 🙂

  2. wonderful

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